Source: Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems  announcement

ELYRIA, Ohio – Consider these three demands of modern full-function air dryer technology: more dry air for the systems today’s trucks depend on; improved energy efficiency; and air system diagnostics. The new Bendix® AD-HFi™ air dryer delivers on all three with the addition of electronic pressure control.

The AD-HFi model features the same leading-edge design of the Bendix® AD-HF® dryer – which Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC (Bendix) launched in 2019 – but incorporates a solenoid-operated valve that replaces the traditional mechanical governor.

“An electronically controlled governor means we precisely regulate the dryer’s charge and regeneration cycles using Bendix’s Electronic Air Control (EAC) software,” explained Rich Nagel, Bendix director of marketing and customer solutions, Air Supply and Drivetrain. “This function enables the dryer to operate under different parameters in different conditions, increasing its dry air processing capability and saving energy. That same software also provides diagnostics that help fleets and owner-operators get the most out of their dryers and cartridges.”

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The AD-HFi is available for order through several major North American commercial vehicle manufacturers.

Mechanical vs. Electronic

With a traditional mechanical governor, a commercial vehicle air dryer has two fixed set-points that determine when the compressor charges and unloads. When the system pressure is fully charged – typically at 130 psi – the mechanical governor sends a pressure signal that tells the compressor to unload.

As the vehicle’s brakes are applied – or any other air-driven system uses the compressed air supply – the pressure decreases, and at 110 psi, the governor again signals the compressor to build pressure and recharge the system.

While a mechanical governor’s status operates within two fixed pressure settings, the Bendix® AD-HFi™ air dryer’s solenoid is controlled by Electronic Air Control (EAC) software, which monitors a range of data broadcast across a truck’s J1939 network, including speed, engine torque, and RPM.

“With EAC software, the AD-HFi unit can modify its charge cycle based on air system and engine demands,” Nagel said. “If the software determines that the air system requires extra drying capacity – let’s say you’re hauling multiple trailers or have extra axles, for instance – then it can command additional short purge cycles.

“This patent-pending technology is called Interrupted Charge Regeneration (ICR). This enhanced purge capability provides significantly more dry air for vehicles that need it.”

The entire announcement can be viewed by clicking HERE.