Tuesday, January 26

Bendix Tech Tips: The ABCs of Winter Prep

Source: Bendix announcement

ELYRIA, Ohio– Freezing temperatures; snow and ice in the air and on the ground; corrosive road treatments: Winter throws a lot at truck drivers and their vehicles. With an eye on keeping trucks in good operating condition in cold and nasty weather, this installment of the Bendix Tech Tips series provides reminders on taking proper care of air, brakes, and controls system components.

A Is for Air

“A lot rides on a truck’s air system – from braking to automated manual transmissions to emissions controls – and, in particular, on a reliable supply of clean and dry compressed air,” said Richard Nagel, Bendix’s director of marketing and customer solutions – Air Supply & Drivetrain. “When it’s cold, moisture in the air system can condense and freeze, which increases the odds of brake and valve malfunctions. That’s why it’s always advisable to manually drain the air tanks at the start of the cold weather season. And while draining every three months is generally sufficient, monthly or weekly drains may be necessary for vehicles like vocational trucks, which have a high air demand.”

B Is for Brakes

“At the wheel-ends, the onset of winter weather means paying extra attention to brake components,” said Mark Holley, director of marketing and customer solutions – Wheel-End. “During pre-trip walk-arounds, drivers should look at the air brake chamber housings for corrosion or damage that could allow corrosive materials to take hold, and make sure that dust plugs are properly installed. The idea is to prevent corrosion from getting a foothold when these areas are most exposed to hazardous situations.”

Related post;
Bendix Tech Tips: Auto Slack Adjuster Maintenance

In the shop, there are several steps to take to keep braking components healthy in the winter. On drum-braked wheel-ends, lubricate the automatic slack adjusters, clevis pin connections, cam tubes, shafts, and bushings. It’s a standard preventive maintenance procedure that also keeps moisture from building up and enabling corrosion.

On wheel-ends equipped with air disc brakes, check the guide pins and inspect the boots for tears or punctures that could permit corrosion. Replace any pins or boots as needed. Verify that the shear adaptor cover is in place and fully seated. Also, check for free movement of air disc brake pads in the carrier. If necessary, remove them and clean the carrier surface with a wire brush to make sure the brake moves freely on its guidance system.

The entire set of tips can be viewed by clicking HERE.

About Author

The Brake Report

The BRAKE Report is an online media platform dedicated to the automotive and commercial vehicle brake segments. Our mission is to provide the global brake community with the latest news & headlines from around the industry.