SALISBURY, U.K. – Media reports pin a train collision and derailment, which sent 13 persons to the hospital, on the failure of the system’s emergency brakes.

According to the article on the BristolLive website, “Preliminary findings have revealed that although emergency brakes were applied, they failed to stop the two trains colliding.

“Inspectors from the Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) have been at the scene of the crash at the Fisherton Tunnel since it happened on Sunday evening, combing through evidence in the wreckage.

Preliminary findings have revealed that although emergency brakes were applied, they failed to stop the two trains colliding.”

On Nov. 2nd the RAIB stated that initial evidence indicated that, although the South Western Railway (heading south from London) driver had applied the brakes, his train had failed to stop at a signal and collided with the Great Western Ralway train; wheel slide, as a result of low railhead adhesion, was the most likely cause.

Announcing a formal investigation on Nov. 3rd, the RAIB said that the On Train Data Recorder showed that the driver had made an emergency brake application twelve seconds after he initially applied the brakes, and that a further emergency brake demand had been made by the Train Protection & Warning System fitted to the train.

Another report said this was the first collision between two passenger trains in the United Kingdom since October 1999.

A further post said four of the 13 persons taken to the hospital were admitted for treatment.

The investigation is ongoing.