Source: Ott Zimmermann announcement

SINSHEIM, Germany — Under the name FusionZ, Otto Zimmermann, a manufacturer of sophisticated automotive components for the independent aftermarket and car manufacturers for more than six decades, is developing high-quality compound brake discs. So far, customers can choose between the brake discs of Formula:Z as well as Formula:F and Formula:S series.

At Otto Zimmermann, the name FusionZ stands for high-quality compound brake discs, the development of which has been based on experience gained in racing.

Conventional brake discs are a one-piece solution made out of one material, usually gray cast iron. In contrast  compound brake discs are made of different materials, namely cast iron for the friction ring and aluminum or rather steel for the hub. Both parts are then joined together by metal pins (Formula:Z series) or are positively riveted together (Formula:F series) or are casted with one another (Formula:S series).

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Reduced unsprung mass, improved driving performance

The compound design has several advantages: The total weight of the brake disc is significantly reduced. The weight reduction amounts to several kilograms per vehicle. This not only has a direct impact on fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and acceleration, but also improves driving characteristics.

Like the tire, the rim and parts of the axle shafts, wheel bearings, shock absorbers, springs and stabilizers, the brake disc is part of the so-called “unsprung mass”. This is the term used to describe vehicle parts whose mass acts directly on the road surface without suspension.

The higher the proportion of unsprung mass in relation to the sprung mass (of the body), the greater is the effect of the wheel load fluctuations occurring during driving on the handling of the car: especially in curves, it loses stability.

But also braking performance and driving comfort are deteriorated by a higher unsprung mass. In racing in particular, the design of rims and brakes is therefore increasingly moving toward lightweight components, which also include compound brake discs.

To view the entire announcement, click HERE.