Source: Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems announcement

ELYRIA, Ohio –  Brake Safety Week is coming up soon, and the entire North American commercial vehicle industry knows it – so there is no reason not to be ready. Still, last year’s Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) weeklong inspection event saw nearly 5,200 vehicles across the United States, Canada, and Mexico removed from service for brake-related violations. And the team at Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems would like to help lower that number.

“So many of these out-of-service violations – situations that present actual hazards to roadway safety for the drivers and everyone around them – are preventable through proper maintenance practices and regular equipment examination,” said Fred Andersky, Bendix director – demos, sales, and service training. “With Brake Safety Week 2021 set for August 22-28, now is the time for fleets and owner-operators to prepare, not just with the goal of passing inspections, but to help make sure that vehicles are running at their safest, and that today’s higher-level safety systems like full stability and collision mitigation are supported by optimally maintained brakes at the wheel-ends.”

Related post:
Operation Safe Driver Week Gets Bendix Support

Brake Safety Week is part of CVSA’s Operation Airbrake initiative – an outreach and enforcement campaign that aims to reduce the number of highway crashes caused by faulty brake systems on commercial motor vehicles.

The event involves local, state, provincial, territorial, and federal motor carrier safety officials in the United States, Canada, and Mexico inspecting large trucks and buses, focusing on brake system violations. Bendix, the North American leader in the development and manufacture of active safety, air management, and braking system technologies for commercial vehicles, supports CVSA’s goals to improve vehicle safety across North America.

What to Expect During Inspection

Brake Safety Week roadside inspectors regularly conduct North American Standard Inspections, which cover a range of driver qualifications, documentation, and vehicle equipment conditions. Where brake systems in particular are concerned, they’ll be checking for:

•           Loose or missing parts
•           Air or hydraulic fluid leaks
•           Trouble-indicator lights on the dash, including antilock brakes (ABS)
•           Worn linings, pads, drums, or rotors
•           Mismatched air chamber sizes across axles
•           Warning device functionality (such as antilock braking system indicator lights)
•           Proper brake adjustment
•           Brake hoses and tubing condition (a special focus for this year)

When possible, inspectors will measure pushrod stroke to ensure brakes are properly adjusted. Drivers can incur fines if more than 25 percent of a vehicle’s wheel-ends are out of adjustment, and too many out-of-adjustment brakes can lead to the vehicle being placed out of service.

How to Get Ready and Prevent Violations

To view the entire announcement, click HERE.