KOLBOTN, Norway — The following is excerpted from a Teslarati.com post by Simon Alvarez concerning regenerative-braking issues of the new Ford Mustang Mach-E.

Ford has pledged to address an issue that has emerged in a number of Mustang Mach-E vehicles in Norway, which resulted in the all-electric crossovers shutting down in a popular tourist spot. The American automaker has noted that a software update should fix the issue.

As noted by Norway-based motoring news outlet Motor.no, several Mustang Mach-E owners reported that their vehicles suddenly stopped while they were driving down the winding and steep “Eagle Road” down to Geiranger, one of the country’s most famous tourist roads. All six of the Mustang Mach-E units that exhibited the issue had to be transported to the nearest Ford workshop.

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Karl Martin Rønneberg, a salesperson based in Eidsdal and a member of the Norwegian Automobile Federation (NAF), confirmed that the incidents did involve Ford Mustang Mach-Es. “I have had six salvages of the same car model in 14 days,” he said. Since the vehicles were stopped, Rønneberg noted that the Mach-Es had to be transported using a tow truck.

Ford Norway has responded to the incident, stating that what happened to the six Mach-Es was a “security feature that crashes due to (a) software bug.” As per Rønneberg, the vehicles that exhibited the issue were all being driven down the winding road with maximum regenerative braking to gain some battery charge. The Mach-Es essentially experienced too much regen braking, resulting in the vehicles’ batteries getting too hot.

When this happened, the Mustang Mach-E stopped to prevent overheating.

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