Source: Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems announcement

ELYRIA, Ohio – The road is a terrible place to wonder whether your replacement brake shoes were truly remanufactured – or just relined and given a new coat of paint. And knowing matters: Not quite a decade after beginning serial production of Bendix® remanufactured brake shoes, the company has produced more than 10 million units, delivering the performance and value that fleets and owner-operators require for safe trucks and a secure bottom line in the trucking industry.

“We’ve got 40-plus years’ experience in remanufacturing, combined with decades of brake manufacturing leadership, so it’s no surprise that professionals across North America have come to expect the best from Bendix remanufactured brake shoes,” said Mark Holley, director of marketing and customer solutions, Wheel-End. “With Bendix, you’re not just getting a shoe that’s been cleaned up and had new friction attached: We return brake shoes to their original equipment (OE) specifications, so they’ll perform to safety and compliance standards while offering the cost advantages that come with choosing reman components.”

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Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC, the North American leader in the development and manufacture of active safety, air management, and braking solutions for commercial vehicles, handles the complete salvage, coining, and assembly processes that make up start-to-finish brake shoe remanufacturing at its Huntington, Indiana, facility.

OE Process, OE Quality

Opened in 2012 and significantly expanded in 2014 to more than 74,000 square feet, the Bendix Remanufactured Shoe Center is part of the bustling multisite Bendix manufacturing campus in Huntington.

Bendix coins 100 percent of its brake shoes to return them to OE geometry, so they will perform as designed by OE engineers. In doing so, the company stands apart from brake shoe reliners, which make up the majority of reman brake shoe producers.

Coining is a crucial step that corrects deformities caused by force and temperature changes during a shoe’s previous service life that can leave it “twisted,” and prevent it from making full contact at the anchor pins and/or in the roller pockets at the S-cam.

To view the entire announcement, click HERE.